Ines Medina

Inés Medina: The Concept of Plastic Division


Exhibition

Inés Medina: The Concept of Plastic Division


Inés Medina: ‘The Concept of Plastic Division’

Inés Medina’s recent work combines the rigor of formal plastic concepts with a highly developed experimental approach to art making.

In the press release of the exhibition SKOTO GALLERY – Inés Medina and Katherine Taylor (Sept-Oct, 2012), the Director of the gallery defined Medina’s work: “She explores the visual sentiments of nature and employs an inimitable ability to unite color, light and texture to create work of remarkable elegance and lyrical beauty. The impression they leave on the eye is distinct yet intangible. Ines Medina hails from the Basque Country, Spain. Her work pulsates with vigor and evinces a sense of delicate ambiguity that helps summon the true power of their abstract presence. Her work encapsulates a desire for the expressive content, theories and reinvented formal strategies that underpins the aesthetics inherent to the Basque soul. Ines Medina obtained a Master in Fine Art in 1982 at the Bilbao University in Spain. She has widely exhibited in Europe and the US. Her work is included in several private and public collections around the world.”

The Concept of Plastic Division: 20 Series of an Analytical and Experimental Method used for the Awareness of Conscience of Unification or the Identity of The Being.

Two big pillars sustain the totality of her artistic-theoretical investigation. First, a Formal one: Abstract and Geometric (1978-1995) created almost in its entirety in Bilbao, Spain. Second, an Organic–Energetic one: Abstract Symbolic (1996-2013) investigated in New York, with the exception of the Series 20, which was developed in Bilbao.

The paintings exhibited at the Embassy of Spain in Washington, D.C., correspond to a selection of the Abstract Symbolic block and most of them belong to the Series, 15th The Transcendence of the Ego, 18th The Joy of The Being, 19th Burnt Dolls and 20th The Transmutation of the Mind, Capacity to visualize the Totality, and Feminine Identity. This research was completed with the precise intent to modify her own mimecry which was acquired and perpetuated from the unilateral social values.

Admission is free and open to the public. Visiting hours: Monday-Thursday, from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm, and Friday, from 9:30 am to 2:30 pm. With the collaboration of Skoto Gallery, NYC.

June 5, 2013July 31, 2013

Embassy of Spain‎,

2375 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest,

Washington, DC 20037

More Information at http://www.spainculture.us/calendar/890/

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